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Active Shoe is a research project questioning the production method of a shoe: a 3D printer extrudes a line of plastic on a stretched fabric. The translucent, lightweight, and malleable properties of textiles have been utilized for centuries in apparel design. The Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is utilized in a minimal, reduced way to structure the fabric. By printing material of different layer thicknesses onto stretched textiles, we are able to create self-transforming structures that reconfigure into pre-programmed shapes. The 2D pattern «jumps» after cutting into a 3D shoe. Our research demonstrates a new method for utilizing textiles that can take advantage of their unique properties such as translucence, lightweight and malleability while reducing the complexity of forming processes. The FDM allows for different materials to be extruded with different properties to create simultaneously comfort and stability. Printing one shoe to fit every foot is a foreseeable scenario. Imagine using active materials to produce one-size-fits-all shoes, adaptive fit, and self-forming manufacturing processes. This technique would radically transform the production of footwear forever.

www.christopheguberan.ch
www.selfassemblylab.mit.edu

Irregular Symmetry is an attempt to visualise Soetsu Yanagi’s theory about Beauty, contrasting Western (machine made) and Oriental (hand made or grown) ideas of beauty.
«The ideal of Greek beauty hardly permits of irregularity or asymmetry, for it was founded upon the symmetry of the human body. By contrast the Oriental found irregular beauty in nature outside the human form. … From this causation, man of the West brought about the age of the machine, while the man of the East is still largely dependent upon the hand.» from The Unknown Craftsman: A Japanese Insight into Beauty (from the chapter The Beauty of Irregularity).

Graphite are lathed wooden bowls with a thin graphite (mineral) coating (surface). The graphite - familiar to everyone as writing substance in a pencil - is applied to the completed wooden surface on the lathe (rotating): the result is a thin, shiny (metallic), reflective, (deep) black surface - whereby the timber grain is partially shining through.
The (experimental) surface fundamentally changes the character of the material - from woody, warm, soft to metallic, (cold), hard: and yet the bowls also have a fragile (ceramic, glazed) character.
The bulbous rotational bodies reflect light and mirror the surroundings.

Active Shoe is a research project questioning the production method of a shoe: a 3D printer extrudes a line of plastic on a stretched fabric. The translucent, lightweight, and malleable properties of textiles have been utilized for centuries in apparel design. The Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is utilized in a minimal, reduced way to structure the fabric. By printing material of different layer thicknesses onto stretched textiles, we are able to create self-transforming structures that reconfigure into pre-programmed shapes. The 2D pattern «jumps» after cutting into a 3D shoe. Our research demonstrates a new method for utilizing textiles that can take advantage of their unique properties such as translucence, lightweight and malleability while reducing the complexity of forming processes. The FDM allows for different materials to be extruded with different properties to create simultaneously comfort and stability. Printing one shoe to fit every foot is a foreseeable scenario. Imagine using active materials to produce one-size-fits-all shoes, adaptive fit, and self-forming manufacturing processes. This technique would radically transform the production of footwear forever.

www.christopheguberan.ch
www.selfassemblylab.mit.edu